My Favorite Arenas SG Play (So Far), and The Absence of Wizards Preseason Games On TV | Truth About It.net

My Favorite Arenas SG Play (So Far), and The Absence of Wizards Preseason Games On TV

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Updated: October 7, 2010

So the Wizards preseason game against the Cleveland Cavaliers is not on television tonight. This is something I believe I was aware of (as I received the press release indicating that Comcast SportsNet would broadcast 80 regular season games and three preseason games — the October 28 season opener in Orlando and the November 25 game in Atlanta will be exclusively broadcast on TNT), but still, realizing it this morning made me say … “damn.”

And evidently a lot of others are wishing they could watch John Wall and the Wizards tonight too. Ratings for the first preseason game went through the roof, via the DC Sports Bog, leaving many, some on Twitter today, hungry for more.

But sometimes the advertising dollars just aren’t there for preseason games — not one Washington Capitals preseason game was televised this year. Everyone expected Wall to have an impact, but if they knew he could bring a 55-percent ratings increase over last year’s regular season average for a measly preseason game, I’m sure more television arrangements would have been made … albeit, other games might not fetch the same as a debut.

In any case, both home preseason games (October 12 versus the Hawks — the return of Etan Thomas! — and October 14 versus the Bucks — the return of Earl Boykins!!) will be televised. Otherwise, for the rest of the preseason slate, you’ll have to rely on the soothing voices of Dave Johnson and Glenn Consor on 106.7 The Fan, which you should also be able to hear online (note: the Oct. 17 preseason game versus the Knicks, that will be broadcast live on 1580 AM).

So, in lieu of video, let’s take a look at the diagram of my favorite Gilbert Arenas shooting guard play (so far) that went down Tuesday in Dallas.

This play requires astute timing that might not be fully conveyed in this diagram.

John Wall (No. 2) moves to start at the left side of the court. Andray Blatche (No. 7) goes from the middle to set a ball screen for Wall as Arenas (No. 9) sets up deep in the left corner, and Kirk Hinrich (No. 12) and JaVale McGee (No. 34) move down the court, trying to disguise their intent.

Before Wall even comes off Blatche’s screen, Arenas begins trotting baseline, setting up for a cut once Hinrich and McGee get set for their double screen. Again, timing is very crucial here.

Wall gets the attention he needs off the screen, as does Blatche on the roll, which makes it difficult for the defense to help on Arenas.

A perfect pass from Wall and the drained trey ball from the shooting guard gets the job done. And if that doesn’t work, Wall can reverse his direction and seek out Blatche who has hopefully established deep post position on his man — Dray needs to work more in the post anyway.


Play Diagrams in this post were created in FastDraw.

To learn more about FastDraw and to purchase it today visit their website at www.fastmodeltechnologies.com











  • http://www.nba-analytiks.com kshiz

    That’s awesome. Or if Blatche has bad post position, Wall can break down his defender, get in the lane, and maybe look for Blatche off the double …

    Great diagramming guys!