Gilbert Arenas’ Final Act as a Washington Wizard | Truth About It.net

Gilbert Arenas’ Final Act as a Washington Wizard

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Updated: February 4, 2011

Gilbert Arenas’ tenure as a Washington Wizard, on the court and off, will be remembered in a variety of ways. Some long ago formed a set opinion of him, even before the gun incident. For others, that incident tainted his legacy in D.C. forever. Some choose to mostly remember the fun Gil, the one who hit game-winning shots, led his team to wins, and blogged in a fun manner about it all. Still others, such as myself, continue to digest the meaning of his time with the team, and all the extras.

It’s been done before to certain degrees and from certain angles, and yet there is still plenty of time to further contemplate Arenas and the Wizards. But tonight, as Gilbert makes his first return to Washington as a member of the Orlando Magic, it’s time to look back upon his last official act as a Wizard — his last game against the New Jersey Nets on December 16, 2010 — and how the curiosity of his actions, and subsequent loss, is somewhat fitting, also representing just a small decomposing piece amongst the last ruins of a construction project that ultimately failed to get past the second round of the playoffs. We can’t all be champions, and that’s okay … and which is why we seek memories of good and bad otherwise.

Michael Lee had a very good feature story on the Arenas trade in today’s Washington Post. The relevant excerpt:

The deal wouldn’t have occurred without the approval of Wizards owner Ted Leonsis, who had been adamant since the summer that Arenas wasn’t “going anywhere.” Leonsis shot down a rumor a few weeks before, expressing support for Arenas.

But according to multiple league sources, Leonsis’s position changed when he started to believe Arenas no longer wanted to be in Washington. A person with knowledge of the situation said Leonsis became upset after hearing that Arenas was telling those close to him that a home loss to the Los Angeles Lakers would be his final game in a Wizards uniform and that he was likely headed to Orlando. The comment was a surprise to Leonsis, according to the source, because he was unaware of any trade discussions involving Arenas.

Arenas played the next game, a loss in New Jersey, but was dealt two days later.

So let’s go back to Arenas’ last act as a Washington Wizard in the handy video below…

If the deal wasn’t sealed already, this was Arenas’ last attempt to put the nail in the coffin himself.  And now we move on…


  • Bullets Forever now

    Why was the point of that video and why would you upload it on the eve of Gilbert’s homecoming? Truth About It was my favorite Wizards blog but it’s been going downhill for some time now and I think this marks the end of my loyalty to you all.

  • http://www.truthaboutit.net/ Kyle Weidie

    Sorry that you feel that way, but we try to remember/document the good and the bad. I presented the video in the most straight up manner possible, without bashing Arenas or anything of the sort.

    You use the word “homecoming” fondly, but I can guarantee Arenas doesn’t see it that way … I just saw him in the locker room before the game … he’s filled with angst. He won’t talk to the media. Sure, he’s coming “back” … but “home”? I think not.

    In any case, I don’t see that much of an issue with this post on the day of his return. Why not document his final basketball act as a Wizard, ugly or not? It is what it is (it is also because I didn’t have time to post this around when he got traded … sorry and sat on it and waited for a good time … which is now.)

    Thanks for reading, hope we don’t lose you for good … and I’m sorry if you feel that we’ve fallen off.

    As people with day jobs who spend a lot of our free time covering a team for nothing, all we can do is be who we are and I’m comfortable with that.

  • Charlie Widdoes

    I’m not really sure why this is a big deal. I mean, it’s symbolic, sure, of a tough ending to a career that went south quickly, but it’s not like it’s unheard of seeing a player get T’d up for arguing a foul call. And why was the last foul “stupid?” The team was down 3 with 29 seconds left, they had to foul. This strikes me as a pretty bizarre commentary.

  • http://www.truthaboutit.net/ Kyle Weidie

    It’s not a “big” deal …. it’s just one blog post out of over a dozen or so in a week.

    1) He argued too much, which led to the tech …. especially stupid in a close game with less than 2:30 left.

    2) The foul was stupid. If New Jersey misses, the Wizards get the ball back with at least 8 seconds left on the clock. The foul put the Nets up 5 and the game out of reach. Flip Saunders clearly thought it was a bad foul.

    3) The bizarre lives at this site often, so it really should come as no surprise, I’d say.

  • nfn

    i think the point is that there is no story here. your wording implies that there is. that somehow this video describes a man trying to get out of washington. but it’s just a guy playing ball. who cares. the video doesn’t fit the story.

  • John

    @Charlie Widdoes,
    in basketball, especially in NBA, 3 down with 28 seconds ago is enough time to defend and get a rebound and get a chance at a 3 or even a quick 2. Most teams won’t foul in that situation. So it is kind of a stupid foul. However, I really don’t like this video I feel like Gilbert allowed DC fans to actually believe we can be good…show some love for Gilbert for what he did for the team and the city..

  • rbittmann

    Wow you guys are really defending Gilbert too much. He was awesome for a while in Washington but he brought guns into the locker room, pooped in a dude’s shoe and was the poison in John Wall’s well waiting to happen. This post doesn’t say “GILBERT QUIT ON THE WIZARDS.” Honestly, that wouldn’t even be a big scoop because he’s bad and you’d expect him to.

  • granville w. ghost, esq.

    This is actually interesting. I wondered for awhile if Gilbert had lost a step. Taken in isolation, you can clearly see him being beaten with the feet by Devin Harris each time, and responding how players who have lost a step do — the flailing grabbing foul on one end, the charge on the other.

    Nothing wrong there as Devin Harris is a pretty nimble guy who beats a lot of people with his quickness, but what’s worse than a slow, small guard is a slow, small guard who was once quick but has lost it.

    Watching Arenas in Orlando… It’s sort of like what a critic said about the last Star Wars animated movie. “Remember how everyone moaned that The Phantom Menace was an atrocity, even though, c’mon, it really wasn’t THAT bad? Well, this one IS that bad.” I never thought Arenas was as destructive to a team as he was said to be but now, chucking shots in Orlando and breaking down their offense with slow drive and kicks and the like, yeah… he’s really that bad.

    (Coming from a Bulls’ fan so hey, I don’t have a horse to back here except as a basketball fan.)