DC Council Game 75: Wizards 78 at Raptors 88: Up North Trips, Second Half Drips | Truth About It.net

DC Council Game 75: Wizards 78 at Raptors 88: Up North Trips, Second Half Drips

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Updated: April 4, 2013

[D.C. Council: setting the scene, rating the starters, assessing the subs, providing the analysis, and catching anything that you may have missed. Unlike the real DC Council, everything here is on the table. Game No. 75, Washington Wizards at Toronto Raptors; contributors: Kyle Weidie and John Converse Townsend via televised broadcast.]

The Bill: Washington Wizards DC Council

Dueling Faces.

[#WittmanFace vs. #OkaforFace]

Washington Wizards 78 at Toronto Raptors 88
[box score]

MVP: Jonas Valanciunas for the Raps, who scored a career-high 24 points and added 10 rebounds to the cause. Okafor played OK.

Stat of the Game: Field goal percentage, again—.325 for the Wizards and .455 for the Raptors. On a night like that, the Wizards could have used some easy points at the free throw line, but they were outscored 27-21 from the stripe.

—John Converse Townsend (@JohnCTownsend)

Key Legislature: Washington Wizards DC Council

A Second-Half Turd.

The Wizards had built a 15-point lead approaching intermission, thanks to yet another wide-open jumper for Emeka Okafor, assisted by John Wall. But, over the last 90 seconds of the second quarter, Toronto grabbed some momentum and cut Washington’s lead to nine points, only to be pushed back to 11 by a Trevor Ariza jumper right before the half. Then, the third quarter. I’m not sure what was said at halftime by Randy Wittman, but whatever was said by Raptors coach Dwane Casey obviously trumped that. The Wizards only scored 12 points in the third, going 4-for-21 from the field, as Toronto scored 29 points, converting their deficit to a six-point lead heading into the fourth. The Raptors forced the issue and got to the free throw line 18 times in the third, making 13; the Wizards shot 4-for-4 from the line in the period. From there, Wittman’s team just kind of laid down and took it, and the commentary from Comcast’s television duo, Steve Buckhantz and Phil Chenier, kept getting more grim, even as Washington was within five, six points with five minutes left in the game. Flush that one down the bowl.

—Kyle Weidie (@Truth_About_It)

Council Members: Washington Wizards DC Council

Rating five Wizards starters & two key subs on a three-star scale.

John Wall
John Wall shot 1-for-10 from outside the paint (5-for-18 overall), and only one of those jumpers came from the left side of the floor—just barely. Defenses are looking to keep Wall away from the right elbow where he’s shooting better than 54 percent, so he needs to do a better job of taking the best shot available, rather than the shot he’s most familiar with. With that said, Wall went 10-for-10 from the free throw line and did a nice job in the pick-and-roll against Toronto. That helped the point guard pick up five assists (and he could have had many more had his teammates been able to score).

—John Converse Townsend (@JohnCTownsend)

1.5 out of 3 stars

Garrett Temple
I’m fairly certain Garrett Temple played in Canada. I know he didn’t forget his passport or anything like that. In fact, the box score says he played almost 16 minutes. Not in the second quarter and not in the fourth, but Temple played, soaking up reverse minutes for those not around (whatever that means).One day we like Temple, the next day we also like him… just better in the D-League. In his time on the court, he missed two shots, grabbed two rebounds, got an assist, two steals and committed zero turnovers. He also finished minus-11 in plus/minus. With Bradley Beal now out for the season, it’s a shame to read reports that the Wizards don’t intend on signing anyone from the D-League. Instead, a roster of 11 … and then Jason Collins and Chris Singleton, who has evidently been relegated back to “DNP-CD” status. On top of that, you have the less-than-healthy statuses of Nene and Martell Webster. Are the Wizards really penny-pinching that much where they can’t even add a body as the chase for ninth continues? Seems like it.

—Kyle Weidie (@Truth_About_It)

0.5 out of 3 stars

Martell Webster
Confirmed: Martell Webster’s worst game as a Wizard. He went 1-for-8 from the field, 0-for-4 from 3-point land, and 2-for-4 from the free throw line. Sure, he had some less-than-stellar games earlier in the season, but those were different times. This here is the chase for 33 wins and/or ninth in the East. Since Webster came back from missing two games with a strained abdominal muscle, he’s 1-for-14 from the 3-point line. Diagnosis: The guy is likely playing hurt, trying to make a good impression, wanting to do the right thing… Here’s to hoping Webster does the reasonable thing.

—Kyle Weidie (@Truth_About_It)

0 out of 3 stars

Nene
Nene looked more healthy in Toronto, I think. He even had a couple of those dunk thingees where he extends his arm as much as he can, kind of jumps, throws it hard through the rim, and then kicks his leg out for leverage. Nene finished the night with 12 points (5-for-12 FGs), five rebounds, five fouls, three turnovers, one assist, and numerous complaints to the refs. He couldn’t build a defensive rhythm with Okafor & Co., and he couldn’t get a break from the whistles, which mostly had to do with Toronto’s aggressive, lane-packing defense; they frustrated the hell out of the Brazilian. And Nene’s jumper? His .324 percent on jump shots from 10 feet and beyond for the season is one of the worst on the team, worse than Okafor’s .368 and worse than Kevin Seraphin’s .363. [via basketball-reference.com]

—Kyle Weidie (@Truth_About_It)

1 out of 3 stars

Emeka Okafor
Emeka Okafor carried his fair share of the scoring load. He had 17 points on 16 shots and went 7-for-13 on jumpers, mostly wide-open from mid-range since the Raps were packing the paint. And while he struggled against Jonas Valanciunas early (name a Wizards player who didn’t…) he did well on that end of the floor, too, grabbing seven defensive boards (eight total), one block and one steal.

—John Converse Townsend (@JohnCTownsend)

1.5 out of 3 stars

AJ Price
A.J. Price loves to shoot 3s from the right wing, above the break. He hit a few shots from that spot earlier this week against Chicago, and hit one from that “hot spot” against the Raptors in the second quarter. (See his heat map here.) Trouble is, that was the only shot Price made all night. Wall’s backup went 1-for-6 and finished with five points (two earned at the line) in his 19 minutes of run. Rough.

—John Converse Townsend (@JohnCTownsend)

0.5 out of 3 stars

Trevor Ariza
Trevor Ariza hit one damn lucky 3-pointer early in the second quarter. Caught dribbling away from his basket, he quickly looked to the other end of the floor, realized the shot clock was almost done, spun around, and in one motion and off one foot, tossed the ball in the net from deep. Otherwise, he went 3-for-9 from the field and 2-for-5 from long distance for eight points and seven rebounds in 34 minutes off the bench.

What are these last seven games for Ariza? Are they a showcase for a potential contract opt-out and free agency? Will he simply play out the year knowing that he’ll be a Wizard next season? One thing is certain, with Beal out and team brass unwilling to add anyone, Ariza will get plenty of burn over the last few contests.

—Kyle Weidie (@Truth_About_It)

1 out of 3 stars

The Mayor: Washington Wizards DC Council

[via @wzzntzz]

Out Of Playoff Gas, At Last.

The Raptors’ defensive strategy was to collapse into the paint. The reason: The Wizards were without Bradley Beal, who’s out for the rest of the year with a “stress injury” to his right fibula, so why not clog the middle and force players not named John Wall to beat them from the field. Trevor Ariza failed, going 3-for-9. Martell Webster, who averaged 32.5 percent shooting from the field in his last three game, went 1-for-8. Seraphin, Martin, Price and Booker combined for 17 points; Okafor scored 17 alone. Not enough shooters, not enough answers.

Defensively, the Wiz didn’t have enough answers either, letting a 15-point second-quarter lead slip away over the course of the final 26 minutes. The Wizards strategy seemed to be to chew up Valanciunas, but the young Euro big man was unfazed by the contact in the paint. In fact, he was dominant, earning “M-V-P!” chants from the Air Canada Centre crowd. They weren’t serious, of course, but it was that kind of night. DeRozan was hot, scoring from all over the floor and keeping it all inside the arc.

This was a contest where the Wizards could have used a reliable frontcourt player who can knock down an open jumper to support Wall in the halfcourt. And a scorer with range on the wing. But with neither available, what’s a coach to do? The game was there for the taking, but the players dug their hands into their pockets—shoegaze.

—John Converse Townsend (@JohnCTownsend)

Adjourned: Washington Wizards DC Council

Canada vs Hookah

[Canadian Bro vs. West Coast Ariza]

Quincy Acy vs Jan Vesely