DC Council Game 77: Wizards 96 at Celtics 107: Letdown in Beantown with Crawfish on the Side | Truth About It.net

DC Council Game 77: Wizards 96 at Celtics 107: Letdown in Beantown with Crawfish on the Side

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Updated: April 8, 2013

[D.C. Council: setting the scene, rating the starters, assessing the subs, providing the analysis, and catching anything that you may have missed. Unlike the real DC Council, everything here is on the table. Game No. 77, Washington Wizards at Boston Celtics; contributors: Rashad Mobley, Adam Rubin and Kyle Weidie via television sets.]

The Bill: Washington Wizards DC Council

“I do not recall the dates in question, your honor.” —Crawfish

Washington Wizards 96 vs Boston Celtics 107
[box score]

MVP: You know, guys, it’d totally be funny if we gave the MVP to Shavlik Randolph. The former Wizards summer leaguer, training camper, and preseason-er, did his unabashed, nondescript hustle thing with eight points on two shots to go with seven rebounds in 15.5 minutes. Otherwise, Brandon Bass put up a game-high 20 points on 12 shots and was key in Boston outscoring Washington 50-36 in the paint.

Stat of the Game: The Wizards attempted eight more shots than Boston, made six more 3-pointers than Boston, but attempted nine less free throws than Boston. Washington missed some open shots, but overall, give the Celtics defense credit for making most every attempt tough. Washington shot 44.3 percent, Boston shot 55.8 percent. And there’s your difference.

—Kyle Weidie (@Truth_About_It)

Key Legislature: Washington Wizards DC Council

Undone in Boston.

[Shavlik had a feeling something bad was going to happen.]

John Wall displays a lot of emotion on the court. When things are going well, there is no bigger cheerleader. When things are going bad, well, he’s no Wizards Girl. In the third quarter, things went bad. After cutting Boston’s lead to one point, 58-57, with 10:26 left in the period, Washington stopped scoring. Over the next six minutes the Wizards scored one point (a Martell Webster free throw off a Kevin Garnett technical) while Boston rattled off 14 to take a commanding 72-58 lead. After both teams traded baskets for a few minutes and after Jason Terry hit a 3-pointer to extend Boston’s lead to 15, Wall decided to take matters into his own hands. He slashed into the lane for a driving layup and was knocked to the ground by Shavlik Randolph. No foul was called and Wall stayed on the ground for a few seconds grabbing his head. He eventually popped up and missed a corner 3-pointer with the shot clock winding down. After the miss, Wall turned to yell at the ref while Randolph beat him down court for a fast break layup attempt. Here’s where Wall let his emotions get the best of him. Wall raced down court and took off for one of his signature chase-down blocks—only this time he did not hang in the air with his hands above the rim, waiting for Randolph to release the ball. Instead, he clubbed Randolph with both hands and shoved him into the stanchion for good measure. For anyone wondering what would have happened if Klay Thompson had gone to the basket, this should answer the question. It was ruled a flagrant 1 and it was the right call. While this one play did not lose the game, Wall definitely lost his cool.

—Adam Rubin (@LedellsPlace)

Council Members: Washington Wizards DC Council

Rating five Wizards starters & two key subs on a three-star scale.

John Wall
Just one night after having his way with the Pacers defense, John Wall struggled to find his rhythm against Avery Bradley and the Boston Celtics. The open shots were there, but Wall could not find the range. The open lanes in transition were available, but Bradley did a good job of cutting him off and slowing him down before he could get to the basket. And on defense, Bradley seemed to make a concerted effort to push the ball up the court, so that Wall had to put his speed and energy to use on both ends of the floor—a challenge considering he played 38 minutes against the Pacers, and 39 the very next night against the Celtics. Wall seemed up to the challenge in the first quarter where he scored 10 points and confidently jawed at Bradley’s attempt to guard him. But after the first period, he shot just 3-for-13, although to his credit, Wall had 10 assists and was doing an effective job at finding open teammates. His frustration finally boiled over toward the end of the third quarter when he flagrantly fouled former Wizard Shavlik Randolph after not getting a call on the other end of the floor. Wall finished with 16 points on 20 shots and zero free throw attempts. [Ed. note: Wall has attempted at least one free throw in all but nine games in his career. —JCT]

—Rashad Mobley (@Rashad20)

2 out of 3 stars

Garrett Temple
Garrett Temple’s minutes have been slashed since A.J. Price returned from injury, but he still gives the same effort with the same results. A couple nice defensive plays, a few missed jumpers, a surprise 3-pointer, and constant hustle. Temple’s game in Boston can be summed up in one first-quarter sequence. With 4:58 left he received an inbounds pass on the right baseline and short-armed a jumper. Jason Terry grabbed the rebound and threw it ahead to Avery Bradley at mid-court with only Nene between him and the basket. Bradley glided past Nene and measured his steps for what he thought was an uncontested layup. Bradley didn’t realize that Temple had sprinted back on defense as soon as his shot missed and was closing in for a perfectly timed block off the backboard. WHAP! Nene grabbed the rebound and tossed it ahead to Webster to start a fast break. Always hustling, Temple ran back inbounds and beat Nene and Webster down the court to help create a 3-on-3 fast break. Wall finished the play with a pull-up jumper from the wing.

—Adam Rubin (@LedellsPlace)

1.5 out of 3 stars

Martell Webster
Similar to the John Wall, Martell Webster had a strong first quarter, and it appeared his mini-shooting slump was over when he shot 2-of-3 from the 3-point line. But offensively, Webster was a non-factor for the remainder of the game, save for a 3-pointer to bring the Wizards within 10 points late in the fourth quarter. He did do a decent job holding Jeff Green (who had been averaging 19 points in his last ten games) to just eight points, but even that was attributed more to Green’s foul trouble than it was to Webster’s play. This was the type of night where Wall needed help from his teammates, and Webster simply did not have it to give.

—Rashad Mobley (@Rashad20)

1 out of 3 stars

Nene
You know it’s not a good night when Shavlik Randolph repeatedly beats you to the ball. Nene was just a step slow all game. The most embarrassing example occurred with 6:58 left in the third quarter. Randolph caught the ball in an isolation on the right baseline about 15 feet from the basket and faced up on Nene. Randolph faked left and drove right around Nene with all the speed and quickness you would expect from a Red Aurbach instructional video. Nene was beaten so badly he had no choice but to grab Randolph from behind and wrap him up. Adding insult to injury, the foul was Nene’s fourth, sending him to the bench for the rest of the period. Nene ended with seven points on 3-for-9 shooting with five rebounds, three assists and three turnovers in 26 minutes.

—Adam Rubin (@LedellsPlace)

1 out of 3 stars

Emeka Okafor
Emeka Okafor had a sub-par game; often, as the team goes, so goes Emeka. He’s best playing off others, that’s for sure. Some nights, he just doesn’t have it, whether it’s beating guys to spots on defense or that jumper of his. Okafor scored eight points and went 3-for-6 from the field—three makes at the rim, two missed jumpers, and one missed tip-in. Okafor also picked up nine rebounds in his 26.5 minutes. But Boston tended to get their way in the paint on the night, and 2-for-5 efforts from the free throw line continue to add up for Emeka. Anyone can improve their shot over the summer, it just takes dedication to build confidence. Will Okafor have that going into a free agent year in 2013-14?

—Kyle Weidie (@Truth_About_It)

1 out of 3 stars

AJ Price
A.J. Price (15 points), Kevin Seraphin (10 points), and Trevor Ariza (14 points) all had solid showings for a Wizards bench that out-scored Boston’s 46-42—Price is getting reviewed because he was only minus-3 on the night, compared to Seraphin (minus-4) and Ariza (minus-10). But the issue here is that a poor showing from Nene and the standard little showing from Garrett Temple had more of a bearing on bench production. Price hit a couple big 3s down the stretch (3-for-6 from deep on the night) to help the Wizards climb back in the game. Otherwise, if the main rotation of eight players next season is shaping up to be Price, Ariza and Seraphin off the bench after Wall, Beal, Webster, Nene and Okafor, then the Wizards will be in trouble.

—Kyle Weidie (@Truth_About_It)

1.5 out of 3 stars

Jan Vesely
With Washington trailing 89-77 with nine minutes left in the game and needing a spark off the bench, Wittman inserted everyone’s favorite 2011 first round pick. Jan Vesely had not recorded a stat (other than two personal fouls) in his previous two appearances, but in Boston he made an immediate impact—in a very Vesely sort of way. He chased down Courtney Lee from behind on a fast break and blocked his layup attempt. However, as Vesely was falling out of bounds he tipped the ball back in bounds—right to Chris Wilcox for an easy basket. Nevertheless, Vesely was extremely active all night. He was credited with two steals and two blocks, but he had a lot more deflections and disruptions that do not show up in the box score. This is how Vesely has to play every night if he wants a spot in the rotation. The points might not be there, but he has to be the most active player on the court every time he enters the game. Otherwise, well, he’s just Jan Vesely.

—Adam Rubin (@LedellsPlace)

2 out of 3 stars

The Mayor: Washington Wizards DC Council

“Y’all know when the third quarter starts?”

[Standard #WittmanFace Intensity.]

In his press conference before the Indiana Pacers game, Coach Wittman said he was looking forward to seeing how his team responded to playing four games in five nights against playoff opponents. The coach had to be feeling confident in the first quarter when John Wall and the rest of the Wizards displayed smart, high-energy basketball and only trailed the Celtics by one after the opening period. But when that energy subsided, and the Celtics’ bench began to put their imprint on the game (and on the Wizards), Wittman did not have the answer, despite getting strong bench performances of his own from A.J. Price, Trevor Ariza and Kevin Seraphin. Losing the services of Trevor Booker in the second half was a big blow, especially when Brandon Bass, Shavlik Randolph and Chris Wilcox seemed to have their way in the post. Wittman also deserves a bit of criticism for playing Wall too long (39 minutes) and Price too little (24 minutes)—especially considering his good buddy, Doc Rivers, was consistently sending a second defender at Wall in pick-and-rolls.

—Rashad Mobley (@Rashad20)

Adjourned: Washington Wizards DC Council

Parting Shots.

[post screen shots via Adam Rubin]

["I thought they liked me during summer league."]

["Why the f*** didn't you warn me about Crawford?"]